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Joomla’s Response to Overturning Net Neutrality in the United States

Joomla! - Fri, 12/15/2017 - 07:00

New York - December 15, 2017
The FCC (Federal Communications Commission) vote on Thursday December 14, 2017 to repeal Net Neutrality, while unfortunately expected, is tremendously disappointing to all believers of an open and free internet.
Open Source Matters, Inc. and the Joomla Community believe wholeheartedly in content creation and dissemination. We as a community have been overwhelmingly in favor of retaining Net Neutrality in the United States and worldwide and will seek to make our voices heard in as many ways as possible.

Categories: CMS

10 Ways You Can Use Blogging to Get More Sales

PrestaShop - Fri, 12/15/2017 - 05:13
The numbers are in: 53% of marketers agree that blogging is the most popular content marketing initiative—according to a recent study that was conducted by HubSpot.
Categories: E-commerce

Liferay Documentation Survey Results

Liferay - Thu, 12/14/2017 - 17:14

This year, the Knowledge Management team at Liferay set out not only to document Liferay 7/DXP, but to document it well. To do this, we identified several improvements we wanted to make:

  • We wanted to connect powerfully with users and customers. To do this, we made a significant effort toward documenting the right things, the things people needed the most to learn about. We also did what we could to promote the documentation, through our @Liferaydocs twitter account, being active on the forums, and responding to feedback.
  • We worked to improve the quality of the docs. We divided ourselves up according to Engineering’s functional teams. We worked closely with developers to produce docs not from the perspective of outsiders trying to figure out the product, but from the inside, describing how the product is designed to work, putting the most important features front and center.
  • We collaborated cross-functionally with other groups like Liferay’s Support team. This helped us improve the docs by identifying and answering the questions users and customers asked us about.
  • Finally, we looked for ways to broaden our communication services and skills. Realizing we have someone trained in CGI, a musician, and a voice-over artist on the team, we started enhancing several tutorials with videos. Look for more of these in the future.

But it wasn’t enough to try all these things, pat ourselves on the back, and say we took Liferay’s documentation to the next level. We care deeply about Liferay developers and their experience with the platform. The only way to really know if we were succeeding was to ask. So we took to Liferay’s Twitter, community chat, and internal systems and asked a whole bunch of questions to help us determine the state of the docs.

Here’s what we learned.

Survey Population

Part of the survey asked about the people filling it out: how long have you worked with Liferay; how often do you code on Liferay’s platform, etc. We wanted to know who we were reaching and what their needs are.

First, the experience level: how long have responders been working with Liferay’s development platform?

The majority of responders are experienced developers. More than half have worked with Liferay’s platform for 5 or more years. Interestingly, though, we have almost as many developers new to the platform as have been working with it for a long time.

Next question: how often have you used Liferay’s documentation?

About two thirds say they use the documentation regularly. This means we have well-informed responders who have regularly searched for and used Liferay’s documentation. Only six said they rarely used the documentation.

Next question: how often do you code on Liferay’s platform?

Again, the majority of responders regularly write code for Liferay’s development platform. This is good: it means most responders refer to the documentation on a regular basis.

Next, we wanted to find out how many people from Liferay responded versus customers and those from the open source community.

We were hoping for more of an equal distribution between developers employed by Liferay and those from the community, so this gives us our first take-away from the survey: how can we better get feedback from the community and our customers? Clearly, the way we went about it didn’t work well.

Reference Docs

There were several questions that examined Liferay’s reference documentation. Let’s dive into those responses.

First, we wanted to ascertain if people were using the reference documentation.

Developers are equally divided between Hourly/Daily/Weekly and Occasionally/Never. We’ll get to why next.

We then asked if developers could find what they wanted in the reference documentation.

Overwhelmingly, developers were either neutral or disagreed with this statement. The plain fact is that Liferay has struggled to document our APIs satisfactorily. While we have made great strides, more needs to be done.

To fix this, we’ve initiated a new process that should streamline Javadoc creation for developers. We’ll follow this closely to make the best impact on our API docs as possible.

Related to this is the experience of finding the API docs, so we asked about that too.

Here, we are doing slightly better. Over the past year, we made an effort to style our API docs to make them easier to read than what’s generated by default. We still have a lot of work to do, however: our presentation on docs.liferay.com is still a default Apache file system browser. We plan to launch a project in 2018 to fix this.

We do invite the community to help with the docs if you’re so inclined. Does anybody know about this? Let’s find out.

This clearly indicates that people are not familiar with the process for submitting Javadocs. We’ve modified the guidelines in our GitHub repository accordingly; please check our repo any time you have a question about the Liferay documentation process. Please also feel free to submit feedback on LDN or on Liferay’s community forums.

We asked other questions about the rules for submitting, but since most people weren’t familiar with how to submit Javadocs, those results aren’t surprising.

The most reasonable interpretation of this is that since most weren’t familiar with how to submit Javadocs, most were neutral on whether there are a lot of rules.

Let’s move on to another section of the survey: how well people can navigate the docs.

Navigation

Some of the most interesting feedback came from the question we asked about navigating the docs.

Less than a quarter of developers agreed with this statement. The number one takeaway from the survey seems to be this: when developers look for docs on a particular subject, it’s hard to find them.

We have big plans for LDN in 2018: integrating it with community.liferay.com and upgrading it to 7.1, along with an entirely new user experience. This includes taking steps to make the docs easier to find and easier to navigate.

Next, we examined whether we had the right format for the docs.

Format

When we first launched LDN, we knew we had two different audiences for docs: newcomers who need a longer, step-by-step series of tutorials to help them get off the ground, and veterans who understand the framework and need short, focused tutorials that cover what they’re working on at the moment. We dubbed the first type of documentation Learning Paths to evoke their longer experience as a journey down a path to Liferay enlightenment. We dubbed the second type as Tutorials to highlight their standalone nature.

We wanted to know if this was working. Do people like the longer Learning Paths, or would they prefer shorter, more focused Tutorials?

Far and away, developers like both. This makes sense: all of us were beginners once, and those longer “from zero to application” Learning Paths are extremely helpful when you don’t even know what you don’t know. Similarly, once developers have their feet under them, they want something quick to refer to, and Tutorials are good for that.

Next, we asked about the format. We’ve gone to web-only documentation for 7.0; was that the right decision, or did developers like the physical books, ebooks, and PDFs we created in the past?

We asked responders to rank the three formats in order of priority. Clearly, the web is the winner here as the number one priority, with ebook/PDF coming in second, and physical book coming in third.

Our final set of questions focused on the docs’ content. This was the core of the survey and the data we wanted the most.

Content

Our questions about the content focused on the quality of the docs: are they relevant; are they detailed enough; do they help people learn? Where they fail, are we headed in the right direction on improving them?

We really wanted to know these things, because we want the docs to serve users and developers well.

The first question asked whether the docs help users learn new concepts.

We were very glad to hear that the vast majority of developers learned new concepts from the docs always/regularly/sometimes. Only 8 developers said rarely or never.

It always helps, however, to ask for the same information in a slightly different way, so we also asked if readers found the answers to questions they had about Liferay from the docs.

We had a similar, but slightly less rosy result. Clearly the always/regularly/sometimes has the majority, but the always and regularly people are fewer than the sometimes people, and we have a larger group who says rarely/never (almost a third). It’s clear that we must do more to learn what developers are struggling with and get those questions answered.

One of the things we want to do more in 2018 is to be more active on the forums, learning what people are struggling with, and then documenting those things. We are also working more closely with our Support team and filling out those areas in the docs where we find customers struggle.

We weren’t done asking about this, though. Next, we had some questions on the level of detail in the docs.

Here, the always/regularly and the rarely/never groups take a little more than half, while the sometimes group is the largest. This was one of the items we tried to address this year by working more closely with Liferay’s developers. Using their knowledge, we dived more deeply into the various development topics. These results show us we made some headway, but we must do more.

We next asked about whether what is documented is relevant to readers’ needs.

Here, the agree/strongly agrees win out, with only a small fraction disagreeing. For the most part, we’re documenting the right things; the things people need to know to get their work done.

Beyond the content, we also wanted to know if we were communicating well. To find out, we asked if the documentation’s writing style is easy to understand and follow.

Almost three-quarters of responders said they agreed or strongly agreed that the docs have a writing style that’s easy to understand and follow. We work very hard on this. I will have a blog entry later on our process, but it’s a multi-step process that’s designed to produce clean and clear prose that’s easy to understand, for both native English speakers and non-native English speakers.

Finally, we wanted to find out about how the documentation trends: is it getting better over time?

Overwhelmingly, the response is yes, the docs are improving. That’s really great to hear, but we know we still have many areas of improvement. We will endeavor to make this improvement trend continue.

Well, that’s the survey. Let me sum up the takeaways here at the end, because they will inform our goals for 2018:

  • We must find better ways of garnering feedback from outside Liferay.
  • We must increase coverage of Liferay’s API documentation (Javadoc, Taglib doc, JSdoc).
  • We must make the presentation of the API docs better. Our redesign of LDN must focus on making the docs easier to navigate.
  • We must be more active on the forums, community chat, and anywhere else to learn about what developers struggle with, so we can document the right things.
  • We want to document the right things with a deeper level of detail.

Thank you to everyone who filled out the survey this year! We will check back next year with another survey to see if we’re able to improve on all these items in 2018.

Richard Sezov 2017-12-14T22:14:45Z
Categories: CMS, ECM

Text Mining Course for KNIME Analytics Platform, Berlin

Knime - Thu, 12/14/2017 - 11:25
Text Mining Course for KNIME Analytics Platform, Berlin oyasnev Thu, 12/14/2017 - 17:25 November 22, 2018 Berlin

KNIME is hosting a Text Mining Course for KNIME Analytics Platform at the KNIME offices in Berlin, Germany on November 22, 2018.

This one day Text Mining Course for KNIME Analytics Platform is an intensive training focused on the processing and mining of textual data with KNIME using the Textprocessing extension. Learn how to read textual data in KNIME, enrich it semantically, preprocess, and transform it into numerical data, and finally cluster it, visualize it, or build predictive models. Text mining experience is not necessarily required for this training.

Register Now

Course Content Thursday, November 22, 2018
  • Introduction to KNIME
  • Reading and Importing Textual Data
  • Text Preprocessing, Semantic Enrichment, and Transformation
  • Text Classification
  • Visualization
  • Text Clustering
Course Fee
  • KNIME Text Mining Training (1 day): € 750
Other Courses

The KNIME Team.

Categories: BI

Big Data Course for KNIME Analytics Platform, Berlin

Knime - Thu, 12/14/2017 - 11:25
Big Data Course for KNIME Analytics Platform, Berlin oyasnev Thu, 12/14/2017 - 17:25 November 23, 2018 Berlin

KNIME is hosting a Big Data Course for KNIME Analytics Platform at the KNIME offices in Berlin, Germany on November 23, 2018.

This one day Big Data Course for KNIME Analytics Platform focuses on processing and mining databases with Hadoop and Spark through KNIME. Learn how to interact with these tools based on an example: eliminating missing values by predicting their values based on other attributes.

Register Now

Course Content Monday, November 23, 2018
  • In-database processing with the KNIME database extension
  • Pre-processing on Hadoop with Hive
  • Data processing and machine learning with Spark
Course Fees
  • Big Data Course for KNIME Analytics Platform (1 day): € 750
Other Courses

The KNIME Team.

Categories: BI

Course for KNIME Server, Berlin

Knime - Thu, 12/14/2017 - 11:25
Course for KNIME Server, Berlin oyasnev Thu, 12/14/2017 - 17:25 November 21, 2018 Berlin

KNIME is hosting a Course for KNIME Server at the KNIME offices in Berlin, Germany on November 21, 2018. We recommend to combine this course with the 2-day Course for KNIME Analytics Platform held November 19-20, 2018.

Course for KNIME Server dives into the details of KNIME Server and KNIME WebPortal and discusses them from three different points of view: the power user, the administrator, and the end user.
All tools and features designed for each one of these three personas are shown in detail and illustrated by means of interactive sessions and hands-on exercises.

Attendees learn how to exchange workflows and data between the server and the client, how to take advantage of the many server dedicated nodes and features when implementing a workflow, how to set access rights on workflows, data, and meta-nodes, share meta-nodes, execute workflows remotely and from the KNIME WebPortal, and how to schedule report and workflow executions, and more.

The course is designed not only for customers, partners, and the community, but also for anyone interested in finding out more about the KNIME commercial platform and its functionalities.

Register Now

Course Content Wednesday, November 21, 2018
  • KNIME Product Overview
  • Roles (Personas) involved in a Data Science Project
  • Introduction to the Use Case (Customer Segmentation)
  • KNIME Server Basic Features
  • KNIME Server Advanced Features
  • Summary and Q&A
Course Fees
  • Course for KNIME Server (1 day): € 250 per user
Other Courses

The KNIME Team.

Categories: BI

Course for KNIME Analytics Platform, Berlin

Knime - Thu, 12/14/2017 - 11:25
Course for KNIME Analytics Platform, Berlin oyasnev Thu, 12/14/2017 - 17:25 November 19 - 20, 2018 Berlin

KNIME is hosting a Course for KNIME Analytics Platform at the KNIME offices in Berlin, Germany on November 19-20, 2018.

Course for KNIME Analytics Platform is an ideal opportunity for beginners, advanced users and KNIME experts to be introduced to KNIME, to learn how to use it more effectively, and how to create clear, comprehensive reports based on KNIME workflows.

Register Now

Course Content Day one – Monday, November 19, 2018 Morning:
  • Introduction to KNIME
  • Reading Data
  • Data Manipulation
Afternoon:
  • Data Vizualization
  • Data Mining
  • Exporting & Deployment
Evening:
  • Group Dinner
Day two – Tuesday, November 20, 2018 Morning:
  • Date and Time
  • Flow Variables
  • Workflow Control
  • External Tools
Afternoon:
  • Advanced Data Mining
  • Model Selection
  • Advanced Applications and/or BYOD (Bring Your Own Data)
Course Fees
  • Course for KNIME Analytics Platform (2 days): € 1'250
Other Courses

The KNIME Team.

Categories: BI

Text Mining Course for KNIME Analytics Platform, Berlin

Knime - Thu, 12/14/2017 - 11:17
Text Mining Course for KNIME Analytics Platform, Berlin oyasnev Thu, 12/14/2017 - 17:17 July 5, 2018 Berlin

KNIME is hosting a Text Mining Course for KNIME Analytics Platform at the KNIME offices in Berlin, Germany on July 5, 2018.

This one day Text Mining Course for KNIME Analytics Platform is an intensive training focused on the processing and mining of textual data with KNIME using the Textprocessing extension. Learn how to read textual data in KNIME, enrich it semantically, preprocess, and transform it into numerical data, and finally cluster it, visualize it, or build predictive models. Text mining experience is not necessarily required for this training.

Register Now

Course Content Thursday, July 5, 2018
  • Introduction to KNIME
  • Reading and Importing Textual Data
  • Text Preprocessing, Semantic Enrichment, and Transformation
  • Text Classification
  • Visualization
  • Text Clustering
Course Fee
  • KNIME Text Mining Training (1 day): € 750
Other Courses

The KNIME Team.

Categories: BI

Big Data Course for KNIME Analytics Platform, Berlin

Knime - Thu, 12/14/2017 - 11:17
Big Data Course for KNIME Analytics Platform, Berlin oyasnev Thu, 12/14/2017 - 17:17 July 6, 2018 Berlin

KNIME is hosting a Big Data Course for KNIME Analytics Platform at the KNIME offices in Berlin, Germany on July 6, 2018.

This one day Big Data Course for KNIME Analytics Platform focuses on processing and mining databases with Hadoop and Spark through KNIME. Learn how to interact with these tools based on an example: eliminating missing values by predicting their values based on other attributes.

Register Now

Course Content Monday, July 6, 2018
  • In-database processing with the KNIME database extension
  • Pre-processing on Hadoop with Hive
  • Data processing and machine learning with Spark
Course Fees
  • Big Data Course for KNIME Analytics Platform (1 day): € 750
Other Courses

The KNIME Team.

Categories: BI

Course for KNIME Server

Knime - Thu, 12/14/2017 - 11:17
Course for KNIME Server oyasnev Thu, 12/14/2017 - 17:17 July 4, 2018 Berlin

KNIME is hosting a Course for KNIME Server at the KNIME offices in Berlin, Germany on July 4, 2018. We recommend to combine this course with the 2-day Course for KNIME Analytics Platform held July 2-3, 2018.

Course for KNIME Server dives into the details of KNIME Server and KNIME WebPortal and discusses them from three different points of view: the power user, the administrator, and the end user.
All tools and features designed for each one of these three personas are shown in detail and illustrated by means of interactive sessions and hands-on exercises.

Attendees learn how to exchange workflows and data between the server and the client, how to take advantage of the many server dedicated nodes and features when implementing a workflow, how to set access rights on workflows, data, and meta-nodes, share meta-nodes, execute workflows remotely and from the KNIME WebPortal, and how to schedule report and workflow executions, and more.

The course is designed not only for customers, partners, and the community, but also for anyone interested in finding out more about the KNIME commercial platform and its functionalities.

Register Now

Course Content Wednesday, July 4, 2018
  • KNIME Product Overview
  • Roles (Personas) involved in a Data Science Project
  • Introduction to the Use Case (Customer Segmentation)
  • KNIME Server Basic Features
  • KNIME Server Advanced Features
  • Summary and Q&A
Course Fees
  • Course for KNIME Server (1 day): € 250 per user
Other Courses

The KNIME Team.

Categories: BI

Course for KNIME Analytics Platform

Knime - Thu, 12/14/2017 - 11:17
Course for KNIME Analytics Platform oyasnev Thu, 12/14/2017 - 17:17 July 2 - 3, 2018 Berlin

KNIME is hosting a Course for KNIME Analytics Platform at the KNIME offices in Berlin, Germany on July 2-3, 2018.

Course for KNIME Analytics Platform is an ideal opportunity for beginners, advanced users and KNIME experts to be introduced to KNIME, to learn how to use it more effectively, and how to create clear, comprehensive reports based on KNIME workflows.

Register Now

Course Content Day one – Monday, July 2, 2018 Morning:
  • Introduction to KNIME
  • Reading Data
  • Data Manipulation
Afternoon:
  • Data Vizualization
  • Data Mining
  • Exporting & Deployment
Evening:
  • Group Dinner
Day two – Tuesday, July 3, 2018 Morning:
  • Date and Time
  • Flow Variables
  • Workflow Control
  • External Tools
Afternoon:
  • Advanced Data Mining
  • Model Selection
  • Advanced Applications and/or BYOD (Bring Your Own Data)
Course Fees
  • Course for KNIME Analytics Platform (2 days): € 1'250
Other Courses

The KNIME Team.

Categories: BI

Big Data Course for KNIME Analytics Platform

Knime - Thu, 12/14/2017 - 11:10
Big Data Course for KNIME Analytics Platform oyasnev Thu, 12/14/2017 - 17:10 May 18, 2018 Berlin

KNIME is hosting a Big Data Course for KNIME Analytics Platform at the KNIME offices in Berlin, Germany on May 18, 2018.

This one day Big Data Course for KNIME Analytics Platform focuses on processing and mining databases with Hadoop and Spark through KNIME. Learn how to interact with these tools based on an example: eliminating missing values by predicting their values based on other attributes.

Register Now

Course Content Monday, May 18, 2018
  • In-database processing with the KNIME database extension
  • Pre-processing on Hadoop with Hive
  • Data processing and machine learning with Spark
Course Fees
  • Big Data Course for KNIME Analytics Platform (1 day): € 750
Other Courses

The KNIME Team.

Categories: BI

Text Mining Course for KNIME Analytics Platform

Knime - Thu, 12/14/2017 - 11:10
Text Mining Course for KNIME Analytics Platform oyasnev Thu, 12/14/2017 - 17:10 May 17, 2018 Berlin

KNIME is hosting a Text Mining Course for KNIME Analytics Platform at the KNIME offices in Berlin, Germany on May 17, 2018.

This one day Text Mining Course for KNIME Analytics Platform is an intensive training focused on the processing and mining of textual data with KNIME using the Textprocessing extension. Learn how to read textual data in KNIME, enrich it semantically, preprocess, and transform it into numerical data, and finally cluster it, visualize it, or build predictive models. Text mining experience is not necessarily required for this training.

Register Now

Course Content Thursday, May 17, 2018
  • Introduction to KNIME
  • Reading and Importing Textual Data
  • Text Preprocessing, Semantic Enrichment, and Transformation
  • Text Classification
  • Visualization
  • Text Clustering
Course Fee
  • KNIME Text Mining Training (1 day): € 750
Other Courses

The KNIME Team.

Categories: BI

First CiviCRM Scotland meet up - a great start

CiviCRM - Wed, 12/13/2017 - 11:15

Scotland joined the civiCRM community in great style at their first meet-up organised by Graham Clarkson of Queensferry Rotary Club and Marcus Wilson of Pooka in the beautiful centre of Edinburgh on Monday 4th December.

A good mix of end users, potential users, implementors and developers got together in MacMillan Cancer Support’s offices to learn more about the community and see a demonstration of how the Rotary Club use CiviCRM to help them successfully manage their hugely popular charity abseil.

Categories: CRM

Kia ora DrupalSouth - stories, insights, Drupal

Drupal - Tue, 12/12/2017 - 23:37

This month’s Drupal Spotlight is a Q&A snapshot from some amazing speakers and organisers behind the recent DrupalSouth in Auckland, New Zealand. We look in and beyond the code at the voices and perspectives of people  building in Drupal and influencing our community, including how they got into technology, and vision for the future.

Please note: videos of the DrupalSouth presentations will be up in the New Year - we will let you know when they are up so you can come back and watch!

Katie Graham

Code | Lego | cats (or for a second opinion) Interested | introverted | innovator

How did you get your start in technology?

As a kid I was always interested in finding out how things worked so I was obsessed with computers from when I first encountered one when I was four or five. We got dial up internet when I was about 14 and I soon figured out how to create websites, later learning PHP and MySQL. I never wanted to get paid for developing websites as I thought it might make it less fun, but a few years later I ended up doing a design degree and it was there that everything came together and I realised that development is what I should be doing. I started using Drupal in the final year of my degree and haven’t looked back!

As one of the organisers of this years DrupalSouth what is the number one tip you could give to people running Drupal events?

There were certain areas that were a lot more work than I anticipated, for example, we received so many more session submissions than we were expecting, so it was quite overwhelming.

I think it’s really important to have a solid core team organising the conference and a lot of helpers for things that need to be done closer to and during the conference. Shout out to the other organisers and everyone who helped us! I’d also say try to relax and enjoy the event itself if you can...

You are the technical director for a New Zealand web company, looking forward how do you expect to see the skill set of the people you need to hire changing over the next five years?

That’s a tricky one as it depends on the direction that technology heads in, as well as what our clients are after. These days we’re hiring people with much different skill sets than we were five years ago as we’ve moved from primarily creating websites to creating apps and business systems too, plus we’re using front end frameworks like Vue.js which didn’t exist five years ago. I think what will stay consistent is that I’ll be looking for people who want to continue learning and are happy to try new things.


DrupalSouth organising team (and @Schnitzel!) Nicole Kirsch | Dave Sparks |  Michael Schmid | Pam Clifford  | Katie Graham | Morten Kjelstrup
Rebecca Rodgers

Passionate | honest | energetic 

How did you get your start in technology?

I kind of fell into it as a HR professional, I was the only one in my team that could translate what the users needed to the tech guys so they could understand it.  That led to a post-grad in online education before moving on to designing great employee experiences.

You specialise in intranets, on day one of looking at an intranet build, what’s the most important advice you give to organisations and their staff when preparing for the journey?

Don't try to tackle too much.  Take a user centred design approach by understanding your employee needs, create a strategy that takes those needs and the needs of the organisation into account and go from there.  Let the needs and strategy drive the project rather than the technology. 

What’s a trend in intranets and adoption of digital transformation that Drupal builders should keep in mind when planning for the future platform needs?

Employees are facing more challenges than ever with the introduction of many information systems in the employee landscape which is making it harder for them to find the information they need.  It is essential to consider the whole Digital Workplace and the Digital Employee Experience which considers how employees work in the digital world rather than just looking at the intranet.

Rebecca's DrupalSouth talk was: Put the employee experience at the heart of the digital workplace

Laura Munro

Nerdy | organised | creative 

How did you get your start in technology?

I got my start in technology through a social enterprise called DesignGel. When I graduated design school in 2013 my friend Denny Ford & I took over as company directors, and along with traditional design work, I would build Wordpress sites for small businesses, teaching myself along the way. Then about 3 years later I got pinched to work at Xequals after talking at a CSS Meetup. 

At DrupalSouth you shared the site https://policy.nz. How important is it for developers to stretch their skills by taking on passion projects from time to time?

I think developers are given a bit of a hard time on this point, because we're continuously learning on the job as it is. Doing passion projects from time to time is fantastic to keep inspiring you to try new things, especially if you're getting bogged down by more boring-ish projects at work.

But I don't think developers should be expected to be coding every waking hour of their day, it makes us less productive and leads to burn out very quickly. I only work a 30 hour week at most, and it's great for productivity and my general well-being.

You are all about the front end. What is your advice on the emerging techniques or frameworks to master for the future of Drupal front end?

Get involved in the community! Drupal and front-end has a great community, in Wellington anyway. Go check out your local tech Meetups and find out what other people are getting excited about, or what their pain points are. My session at DrupalSouth featured the new CSS display properties flexbox and CSS grids, two new features in front-end that I'm really excited about.

Laura's DrupalSouth talk was: Theming Drupal in 2017: A New Hope

Kristy Devries

Sassy | passionate | conscientious 

How did you get your start in technology?
 
My whole life I have always wanted to do everything, especially when it came to creative industries. When I was young, I did not have motivation to keep pursuing hobbies, apart from playing rollercoaster tycoon (which has resulted in me now being a bit cautious around theme parks). I was around fourteen years old when I randomly decided that I wanted to learn how to make websites. So I bought two books, one on HTML and the other on PHP and spent hours everyday after school learning. I initially used my HTML and CSS knowledge to spruce up my MySpace profile page and then I bought a domain name and installed the very first version of WordPress, I did not know about Drupal back then (so sorry), and started a blog. I don’t remember what I wrote about but I remember I had random internet blogger friends, I would list their website on my site and vice versa. Those were the days. 
 
After high school, I did a year of an interdisciplinary creative industries bachelor, before deferring and spending the next few years working in hospitality and traveling around the world.  One morning, while working in a coffee shop in Europe, I decided that I wanted to pursue a career in technology. I came back to Brisbane with a plan to study and concentrate on my career. After dedicating many nights on an application, making a website resume and sending it off, revamping my website resume, sending that off again and numerous calls later, I landed a job as a junior web developer at a local agency in Brisbane - my first job in this tech industry. 

Support can be one of the toughest and sometimes even least rewarding gigs in tech, you seem to really enjoy it… why?
 
While it can certainly be tough sometimes, the people I work with are a big part of why I enjoy it. There’s a real sense of comradery, especially within Acquia Support. If you’re stuck on a puzzling problem, there’s a global group of amazing people ready to jump in to help you. And provide banter of course. 
 
I also get a chance to work on projects, for example presenting at Drupal South, as part of my role within Support. These projects can involve front end web development, user experience, design, strategy, event planning, which gives me a chance to dabble in a few areas of interest. While we do have an office in Brisbane, we have the flexibility work from home, or work remotely from another country (I spent 2 months in USA this year) so I get to travel as well as develop my career, which one of the reasons I wanted to work in the tech industry. 

All in all, I feel like working in Support is a mixture of feverishly putting out fires and being on a treasure hunt. There is definitely always something to learn, and sometimes I feel like after two years in support, I don’t know anything. However, this blend of problems means there’s never really a dull moment! 

You have leadership aspirations, what makes a good leader in the technology industry?
 
A good leader has your back. A good leader gives you challenges and enables you to grow your career. A good leader is transparent and humble. A good leader leverages the frustrations of the team and customers and finds ways to turn that into solutions. A good leader hires the right people because he/she knows that having good coworkers is important for creating a fun and supportive culture. 
 

Kristy's DrupalSouth talk was: How to be a self rescuing Princess

Laura Bell

Security | cat | herder

How did you get your start in technology?

At age 16 I found myself homeless and needing a job. My home town doesn't have many options so I applied to a junior/apprentice software role doing COBOL development. I didn't know much about computers and I'd never coded before but I needed a job and this looked like it had a future (hehe irony). I then went on to study AI and work a range of software and operations jobs before ending up in Security.

You attended DrupalGov in Washington DC this year, what was your main takeaway?

That the challenges we all face require a community to solve them. No single vendor or product can keep us safe or solve our needs so we need to start working together with authenticity and openness.

Looking forward, what’s a piece of security advice or insight Drupal developers and site builders should be thinking about?

80% of our problems can be solved by fixing 20% of our vulnerabilities in security. Pick simple behaviours and changes and try and change them one after another.... it soon adds up. 

Laura's DrupalSouth talk was: Fear itself

Hannah Del Porto

Disciplined | organized | a little bit silly

How did you get your start in technology?

It was an accident. I needed a job in college and ended up doing front-end development to pay the rent. I actually meant to be a lawyer!

At DrupalSouth you talked about the difficulty in making changes to technology once a build is underway, considering the flexibility of Drupal what are some strategies for locking down scope?

Putting scope in writing is extremely important to make sure both sides are on the same page and have a reference for what was agreed on. In my experience there are a lot of situations where you can't lock down scope before you've started work. That's where sprints are helpful so you can review and make adjustments as early as possible.

It's also important to be as up-front as possible. If scope is not settled, be specific about what is undefined and how that may affect timeline and budget. Even for projects with a formal scope, building in a 10% budget and timeline reserve can make changes less painful for everyone.

As a Chief Operating Officer where do you think future trends will evolve over the next couple of years? And how does this shape your forward planning?

10 years ago I took an online Anatomy class which involved having a dead rat sent to my house then uploading photos of its dissected body to our class website. Every day there are new ways to have online experiences that used to require physical presence. At Brick Factory we focus on non-profits, so the future is about looking at how stakeholders interact with organizations and bringing those experiences online in ways that were previously reserved for "real life".

Hannah's DrupalSouth talk was: How to Win Friends and Influence People (on the Programming Team)

Aimee Whitcroft

Open | inquisitive | incorrigible

How did you get your start in data?

I wandered into the open data / open government space over a period of years, starting during my work with the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) and continuing through my work with GovHack NZ and various government departments and civil initiatives.

In your talk you have a slide combining open data, open gov and open source equalling civic technology. Why is civic technology important for society?

Civic technology is about "using technology to help empower the public in its dealings with government(s), though better information-generating/sharing, decision-making and accountability."  It's more than just "hacking for social good - it’s about hacking civic issues, and finding ways to directly help people."

Medium post: Why we keep going on about CivicTechTowards a more open NZ (DrupalSouth Speech notes)

If you could control the trends and data was open by default, would sort of web projects would we be building in the future?

Gosh - that's an impossible question to answer! It would totally depend on the individual communities' needs. I think a great place to look for ideas is at previous GovHack projects (govhack.org.nz and govhack.org). My request would be that technologists (and I don't just mean developers!) find ways to reach out, respectfully and responsibly, into communities - especially our most vulnerable - to ask what they need and want, and then work with them to create those products and services.

Aimee's DrupalSouth talk was: How can open source contribute to a stronger, kinder, more resilient NZ?

Heike Theis

Strangely | optimistic | human

How did you get your start in technology?

When I was about 4 years old, I took a pair of scissors and cut through the cable of my radio to see what electricity looks like. The cable was plugged in, the radio was on, and the scissors had metal handles ... it was an interesting experience. But the incident did not take away an overwhelming desire to understand how things work and to find out if you can make them better. 

During your DrupalSouth talk you shared examples of how you get customers to take control of their content. How important is it to build sites for publishers and digital marketers?

Content is language and language is communication. A site that does not allow 'communicators' to take control of the dialogue (or monologue) with their customers is not a website at all. 

You have been involved in an internal transformation and as a result your team has built a distribution, how does this approach help future proof your company's development needs?

Streamlining and consolidating coding and configuration allows every member of our teams - thinkers, planners, designers, writers, and coders - to concentrate on the ... let's call them 'special' ... features. The things that are not already part of the Distro. The boring bits vanish. E.g. how many times do you want to decide (or discuss) which buttons to show in a minimal WYSIWYG editor profile? The Distro makes this decision for you: it presents you with 11 buttons we decided we want in 'general'. 10 buttons will be right for your specific site, and you might want to remove one and add two others. Still, that leaves you with 9 buttons you don't have to think about every single time. Does that make people happy ... maybe not. But having to add 11 buttons every single time makes most people unhappy. Making people less unhappy in this industry is a big win in my book, and yes I think that helps to 'future proof our team's needs'. 

Mind, working with Distros will not work for every company, every team, or every team member. If you want to re-invent the wheel every time or only do things 'your way', this is not going to work for you. 

Heike's DrupalSouth talk was: From Content Strategy to Modular Design: Kick starting your Drupal Projects

Ruth McDavitt

He tangata | he tangata | he tangata  translation/context (or less poetic English words) Connect | inspire | facilitate

How did you get your start in technology/connecting people into technology?

I've always been a connector, but was working on the business side, helping tech companies connect with customers and global markets. 

Connecting people to technology careers evolved from that, my growing realisation that there's a huge disconnect between what people are learning & exposed to through mainstream education, and the growing need for more relevant & diverse skills to support the development of technology & enterprise & people.

In your DrupalSouth talk you were firm in the need to create opportunities for people to gain experience in technology. Why is this important?

We used to go to school to learn how to do things. with the current pace of technological change, we now have to DO things to learn about them. 

It's always been difficult to get experience without a job, and a job without experience, but the rapid change in tools, processes and technologies means that it's harder than ever for teachers to keep up. 

People (of all ages, backgrounds and experience) are creating, adapting, rejecting and inventing technology, and exposing them to the possibilities & tools is the best way I know to support them to create the future. 

What’s a future trend or opportunity that you think the Drupal community could miss out on if we don’t increase diversity and make space for new people?

Sustaining the Drupal community will only be possible through welcoming newcomers, and supporting their growth and needs. DrupalSouth was my first experience with your community and it felt very healthy! 

For the aspiring tech people I work with though, I don't know what to tell them. Are there good pathways in, for people from all walks of life? Once you're a newbie, is there support & oopportunity to grow? Do you retain diverse senior & experienced people or are they moving on? Do all people feel valued, supported & celebrated? 

I don't know the answers, but DrupalSouth felt open, welcoming, and I had great conversations with a diverse range of people. If you're thinking about these things then I reckon you're on the right track. The value of communities is the people in them, their passion and commitment for doing, sharing and making more awesomeness possible.

Ruth's DrupalSouth talk was: Developing Developers: finding & growing new tech talent

Fonda Le

Passionate | goofy | hyperempathetic 

How did you get your start in technology?

At the last minute, I changed my degree from Design to Media. After uni, I happened to fall into a web production role and (despite still having great interest in the design industry) I haven't looked back since - working in IT/Digital has offered me a variety of opportunities which I'm grateful for.

Why did you choose to talk about the benefits of being an introvert scrum master at DrupalSouth? What do you want people to realise/understand? 

To be honest, I wanted to submit something left of field so I was very surprised to find out my talk was accepted! After working for a bank where mainly extroverts were appreciated and/or promoted and after leading teams with so many introverts, I thought it'd be worth my while to look into generalisations around introversion and there's a bunch of material around on it these days. I feel like the (competent) introvert scrum master works really hard in the background and never asks for anything in return from the team or anyone really so I was keen for people to recognise this. I also wanted to highlight just how interesting the servant leader role is and how much of an influence the role has on a team.

Project management approaches change over time. Is agile here to stay or can you foresee a shift that will be needed for projects of the future as organisational capacity changes?

While agile feels like it's trendy at the minute, I don't think it's going anywhere as there are different 'flavours' that will suit different teams, projects and organisations ie. Scrum shouldn't necessarily be the go-to method for every company.

Having a range of project management methodologies allows us all to be pragmatic - we should be using an approach that makes the most sense for what we're working on (considering what sort of experience or buy-in we have from the team members, company execs, etc) and anything within that approach which doesn't have value can be discarded.

Fonda's DrupalSouth talk was: Benefits of an introvert Scrum Master

Donna Benjamin

Curious | connected | caffeinated

How did you get your start in technology?

We had an apple IIe when I was a kid, I wanted to be a hacker after seeing War Games, I was a Sysop on a couple of telnet BBSes, and I made my first webpage in 1995, I ran my own business for 20 years.  I think I was always a nerd, who loved the shiny glint of technology, so I feel blessed I managed to make it my job! I believe tech helps us change things, make them better. I know it can also be used for less wonderful stuff.  It's on all of us to harness technology's power for good.

‘Being human’ is a stream that is often popular at Drupal conferences, why is it important to focus on the human side of code and tech?

So important. So, so sooo important! Oh goodness me. Why? We make stuff for humans, we are humans. When we forget this, bad things happen.

We must always bring our humanity to the table whenever we make things, and we must acknowledge our collective fragility when we work together. Tech can be high stakes and stressful, and that sometimes brings out the worst in people, but the flipside of this is we can always practice being better humans. And we should. And we should share tips and tricks on how to do so!

You’ve been around Drupal for a while and seen some changes, if you could control the future where will Drupal be in five years’ time? How will it be being used?

Drupal has consistently led the way when it comes to democratising technology that was only available to megacorps.  I hope it continues to do that.  In 5 years time? I reckon Drupal will still be used in ways it's being used right now, just as we see sites created in 2012 still working pretty much the way they did then. But we'll also continue to innovate. Omnichannel digital experiences, extending the web beyond the browser into conversational, kinaesthetic, tactile and mindpowered UIs will stretch us all. Re-imagining content itself, and addressing the challenge of personalisation without facilitating mass surveillance will really test our mettle. The march forward for Drupal is about embracing change, empowering the community, and maintaining our careful balance of commerce and community - it's one of the things I've always thought is special about the DrupalVerse.

Donna's DrupalSouth talk was: Communication skills for everyone

Rikki Bochow

Happy | quiet | focused 

How did you get your start in technology?

I studied graphic design at uni, and always enjoyed the web class (table based html and flash) that was included. I'd applied for a range of design positions afterwards but was particularly keen on web design, so was more than happy when a small web agency called me in for an interview. Unfortunately, I didn't get the job as I didn't have the technical abilities they were after.

I went home and did some online tutorials around the kind of tech they were using, built a one page html/css (with divs!) thank you letter and sent it through, asking, if they had any work experience positions to please let me know! A couple of weeks later they called me in for work experience, which shortly turned into a full time position.

I learnt more and more development languages and started enjoying coding way more than designing.

What’s your favourite thing about the front end changes in Drupal 8 compared to 7?

Twig is probably the one that stands out the most. The fact that there is less Drupalism in the theme layer, so we could hire front end developers who didn't necessarily have Drupal experience was a huge win. I also really like the improvements made to the Asset Library system (surprise!), making adding, overriding and extending core/module and base theme css/js so easy, it's really great.

What advice do you have for a graphic designer wanting to make the leap into Drupal front end development?

Don't let anyone, ever, tell you you can't or shouldn't bother (I was often told that UX would be better for me than development and I'm glad I ignored them)! Coding is the ultimate design tool and I think that's a nice way to think about it - it's not so scary, it's just a new tool. Designing in the browser is heaps of fun, as are animations and transitions (interaction design). You'll always be a designer, you don't have to stop. The two disciplines fit so well together you'll be so much better at both for having knowledge of the other.

Rikki's DrupalSouth talk was: Front-end performance improvements with Drupal 8 Asset Libraries

Next month the Community Spotlight will pay tribute to the life an impact of valued community member J-P Stacey whom recently passed away. We invite you to use this form to share thoughts and memories of J-P for us to share.

Thanks to Dreamcoat Photography for the DrupalSouth images, visit the DrupalSouth Flickr page for more

Some scheduling conflicts mean we will be bringing you the Spotlight article for Fatima Sarah Khalid @sugaroverflow very early in the new year.

Drupal version: Drupal 8.x
Categories: CMS

Accelerate Drupal 8 by funding a Core Committer

Drupal - Tue, 12/12/2017 - 11:44

This blog has been re-posted and edited with permission from Dries Buytaert's blog. Please leave your comments on the original post.

We have ambitious goals for Drupal 8, including new core features such as Workspaces (content staging) and Layout Builder (drag-and-drop blocks), completing efforts such as the Migration path and Media in core, automated upgrades, and adoption of a JavaScript framework.

I met with several of the coordinators behind these initiatives. Across the board, they identified the need for faster feedback from Core Committers, citing that a lack of Committer time was often a barrier to the initiative's progress.

We have worked hard to scale the Core Committer Team. When Drupal 8 began, it was just catch and myself. Over time, we added additional Core Committers, and the team is now up to 13 members. We also added the concept of Maintainer roles to create more specialization and focus, which has increased our velocity as well.

I recently challenged the Core Committer Team and asked them what it would take to double their efficiency (and improve the velocity of all other core contributors and core initiatives). The answer was often straightforward; more time in the day to focus on reviewing and committing patches.

Most don't have funding for their work as Core Committers. It's something they take on part-time or as volunteers, and it often involves having to make trade-offs regarding paying work or family.

Of the 13 members of the Core Committer Team, three people noted that funding could make a big difference in their ability to contribute to Drupal 8, and could therefore help them empower others:

  • Lauri 'lauriii' Eskola, Front-end Framework Manager — Lauri is deeply involved with both the Out-of-the-Box Experience and the JavaScript Framework initiatives. In his role as front-end framework manager, he also reviews and unblocks patches that touch CSS/JS/HTML, which is key to many of the user-facing features in Drupal 8.5's roadmap.
  • Francesco 'plach' Placella, Framework Manager — Francesco has extensive experience in the Entity API and multilingual initiatives, making him an ideal reviewer for initiatives that touch lots of moving parts such as API-First and Workflow. Francesco was also a regular go-to for the Drupal 8 Accelerate program due to his ability to dig in on almost any problem.
  • Roy 'yoroy' Scholten, Product Manager — Roy has been involved in UX and Design for Drupal since the Drupal 5 days. Roy's insights into usability best practices and support and mentoring for developers is invaluable on the core team. He would love to spend more time doing those things, ideally supported by a multitude of companies each contributing a little, rather than just one.

Funding a Core Committer is one of the most high-impact ways you can contribute to Drupal. If you're interested in funding one or more of these amazing contributors, please contact me and I'll get you in touch with them.

Note that there is also ongoing discussion in Drupal.org's issue queue about how to expose funding opportunities for all contributors on Drupal.org.

Categories: CMS

10 consejos para fomentar el uso de tu portal móvil

Liferay - Tue, 12/12/2017 - 11:32

Imagina que tras haber decidido que tu empresa necesita un portal móvil para mejorar la productividad de tus empleados, ofrecer asistencia a tus clientes, o incluso ambos, hayas creado probado,mejorado y lanzado dicho portal. Sin embargo, la cantidad de usuarios y la frecuencia con la que estos lo utilizan son menores de lo que esperabas.

¿Qué se puede hacer para aumentar los niveles de adopción y sacar máximo provecho a la nueva tecnología que has desarrollado? A continuación enumeramos 10 acciones que pueden ayudarte a fomentar el uso de tu portal móvil y superar las barreras que estén limitando su adopción, como pueden ser el escepticismo o las frustraciones generadas por una deficiente experiencia de usuario, y hacer que tu público objetivo (empleados, clientes, etc) se conviertan en usuarios regulares del portal.

1. Utilizar métricas para comprender las tendencias

Mientras que las encuestas son útiles para conocer el feedback de los usuarios, el uso de otro tipo métricas con información sobre cómo éstos están interactuando con el portal son las que realmente te permitirán comprender cómo y por qué lo utilizan. Según Portal Solutions, las dos métricas fundamentales en el análisis de la adopción del portal son: cuánto se está utilizando el portal (incluyendo información sobre el número de páginas visitadas y la frecuencia en la que se utilizan sus funcionalidades) y el número de usuarios únicos del portal, que permitirá descubrir el porcentaje de las personas que lo utiliza y con qué frecuencia lo hacen.Conociendo estos datos, serás capaz de analizar los puntos fuertes y débiles del portal, con el objetivo de optimizar la estrategia de adopción de la herramienta.

 

2. Simplificar el proceso de registros y su uso

Cuantas menos barreras de entrada existan en su portal, más probabilidades existirán de que tu público objetivo se registre en el mismo. Aunque pueda parecer que es una solución demasiado simple para un problema complejo, ya está comprobado que los usuarios abandonan el proceso de registro si lo consideran muy complicado. Los portales necesitan cierta información básica, como puede ser el cargo que ocupa el usuario o el tipo de tareas que realiza para poder ofrecer el acceso correcto a los usuarios. Sin embargo, lo ideal es que el formulario de registro sea lo más sencillo posible, minimizando el esfuerzo del usuario para registrarse, evitando así frustraciones generadas por la mala experiencia de usuario y el posible abandono del proceso. Si se requiere solicitar información adicional, esta puede ser solicitada después de que el registro se haya hecho efectivo, incluso, puede rellenarse automáticamente por el sistema en base al perfil del usuario. De esta forma, el uso del portal móvil será accesible de forma ágil.

3. Convertir el portal en una herramienta esencial para la comunicación

Un buen portal móvil facilita la comunicación y la coordinación de tareas mucho más que otros canales.Por ello, es importante que tu portal se convierta en un pilar fundamental para la comunicación dentro de tu empresa. Según Patient Engagement HIT, comunicar asuntos del día a día a través del portal va a hacer que los empleados reconozcan la necesidad y los beneficios de su uso.

4. Impulsar el poder de la movilidad

Las plataformas móviles ofrecen numerosos beneficios respecto a los portales de escritorio, como pueden ser: facilitar la conexión entre los usuarios y dar acceso ubicuo a la información. Puedes aprovechar estos beneficios y utilizarlos para convencer a tu público objetivo de instalar y utilizar el portal móvil.

5. Mejorar la experiencia del usuario

Descubre cuáles son los principales pain points a los que se enfrentan tus clientes a través de un análisis en profundidad que sea útil para tu equipo: como feedbacks y simulaciones de cómo el portal móvil puede ser utilizado. Cuanto más fácil sea la utilización y mayor diversidad de perfiles tenga el portal, más probable será que tu público objetivo lo adopte en su día a día. Las experiencias de usuario perfectas son las que les proporcionan las informaciones que necesitan, de la mejor forma y lo más rápido posible.

6. Determinar y comunicar los beneficios concretos

Has diseñado tu portal con el objetivo de ayudar a tu público objetivo, pero ¿saben estos cómo les va a beneficiar? Todo el trabajo de desarrollo que has hecho y las métricas que has analizado te ayudarán a definir y especificar bien estos beneficios que deben ser comunicados a los futuros usuarios del portal. Considera el canal más efectivo para comunicarte con tu audiencia: ¿suele ser personalmente? ¿Por correo? ¿a través de tu portal web? Utiliza estos puntos de contacto para proveer información útil sobre el nuevo portal móvil, explica sus beneficios y soluciona las posibles dudas que surjan.

7. Educar y formar a tu público objetivo

La idea de incorporar el uso de un nuevo portal en el día a día de tu audiencia puede provocar cierto rechazo, especialmente si se quiere que empiecen a hacerlo lo antes posible. No obstante, ofrecer formaciones en las que se enseñe cómo se debe utilizar el portal y capacitar a tu audiencia para tu uso, instruirá a tu público objetivo para sacar el máximo provecho del software. Además, de esta manera, los usuarios se sentirán , apoyados y capacitados para introducir el portal móvil en su día a día.

8. Habilitar la personalización

Si tus usuarios tienen la posibilidad de personalizar la interfaz del portal, de modo que esté acorde con sus tareas y necesidades, las tasas de adopción serán más altas, ya que permitirás que cada persona organice su portal de la manera que le va a ser más eficiente. Por ejemplo, la entidad sanitaria Monte Sinai fue capaz de crear un portal móvil que se adaptara a las necesidades de sus usuarios en base a sus perfiles, sincronizándose con todas las fases de su vida sanitaria.

9. Crear soluciones de gobernanza

Desde las fases iniciales del desarrollo en, tu organización va a necesitar soluciones de gestión eficientes, que ayuden a implementar las funcionalidades esenciales para que tu portal responda de manera adecuada a las necesidades de tus usuarios. Una buena gestión del portal permitirá conectar las soluciones a las necesidades y diseñar un plan de crecimiento que asegurará que el portal vaya a seguir siendo relevante en el futuro.

10. Solicitar Feedback

Promover que tus usuarios ofrezcan feedback del portal no solo es un recurso importante para la mejora contínua de la herramienta, es también una buena manera de fomentar su participación. Si tu audiencia siente que tiene un rol importante en su uso y crecimiento, estarán más motivados para invertir su tiempo en ayudar en futuras mejoras. Por ejemplo, una buena forma de tener este feedback es mediante el uso de incentivos, como pueden ser los tickets regalo.

Los beneficios de aumentar la adopción del portal móvil

Al aumentar las tasas de adopción del portal móvil puedes maximizar el impacto positivo de esta herramienta en tu empresa, generando, además, más datos para futuros análisis. Sacando el máximo provecho de tu portal móvil, dotará a tu público objetivo de herramientas que faciliten y ayuden en tu labor diaria, consiguiendo mejorar tu productividad.

Crea portales móviles potentes

Siempre hay más que aprender y mejorar cuando se trata de sacar el máximo provecho a tu portal móvil.

Conoce cómo la Plataforma Móvil de Liferay puede ayudarte   Rebeca Pimentel 2017-12-12T16:32:35Z
Categories: CMS, ECM

Joomla 3.8.3 Release

Joomla! - Tue, 12/12/2017 - 09:45

Joomla 3.8.3 is now available. This is a bug fix release for the 3.x series of Joomla which includes over 60 bug fixes and improvements.

Categories: CMS

CiviCRM v. 4.7.28 release

CiviCRM - Tue, 12/12/2017 - 08:53
CiviCRM v. 4.7.28 is now ready to download.      RELEASE NOTES: Big thanks to Andrew Hunt from AGH Strategies for putting up together release notes for this version.  The release notes for 4.7.28 can be accessed  here.   SPECIAL THANKS:  
Categories: CRM

Four Ways Design Builds Customer Trust

Liferay - Mon, 12/11/2017 - 17:18

A company’s online presence plays a major role in building and sustaining the trust of potential and existing customers. While helpful information, strong customer service, and reliable products are all part of this process, the design of a website’s user experience can play an important role in establishing the trust of visitors.

Design has a subconscious impact on how much audiences inherently trust the information they are given by a brand’s website. The Stanford Web Credibility Project found that 46 percent of surveyed consumers assessed the credibility of a website based in part on the overall visual design of a site, including layout, typography, font size and color schemes.

The following four elements of user experience design can affect audience trust greatly and should be taken into consideration by businesses when establishing their identities online.

1. The Aesthetic-Usability Effect

According to the Aesthetic-Usability effect, a term coined by Nielsen Norman Group, beautiful things are typically seen as easier to use and more valuable than things perceived as ugly. This means that a good looking website or application will positively impact the initial reactions of users. With a positive emotional response to visual design, customers will be more tolerant of minor issues concerning usability and companies will start of their relationships with audience members on a positive note.

However, it must still actually be easy to use. An attractive appearance must be in service to a well-done design. If not, the initial positive sentiments of users will not go far. When combined with the other elements outlined here, the benefits of a great looking digital experience can have a longer lasting impact.

2. The Importance of Transparency

As discussed by UX Design, customers appreciate a degree of transparency regarding the companies they buy from online and in-person. This transparency includes knowing about a company’s employees, customers, motives, pricing and more when interacting with them online. However, transparency doesn’t just apply to the content provided online, but also to how it is presented to audiences.

The harder it is to find such valuable information, the more likely customers are to distrust a business. Just as a website should be designed to help visitors find the services they need as easily as possible, a design should also enable users to find pricing and company information whenever they need. If it seems as though a website’s layout is made to hide crucial information, then potential customers may quickly distrust a business when it comes to their practices.

3. Consistency in Design

Consistency throughout a site plays an important role in maintaining the trust built by a visitor. Should he or she suddenly come upon a section of a business website that does not fit with the rest, suspicions and concerns can quickly arise about the safety, trustworthiness and professionalism of the company itself. Appcues recommends a consistency audit, where a company takes an inventory of all user touch points to see if design, features, functionalities, tone, branding, labels and more are all aligned with one another across these moments.

If there is a lack of congruity between landing pages, services and more, visitors can become confused and may feel that a business cannot provide a professional experience. As such, making sure that there is a consistency to the user experience design of everything presented will help create an immersive user experience.

4. Provide Secure Experiences

Today’s audiences are becoming more aware than ever of the potential security threats occurring online and the consequences of an information breach. As detailed by The Next Web, explicitly telling customers how you are protecting their data can have a major positive impact on the amount of trust felt concerning a company’s website.

This can be done in numerous ways, including providing a seal of approval from the security service being used and an outline of how sensitive information is stored and shared or not shared. Of course, these recommendations come with the need to actually provide the security promised to customers, and not just false promises. There are few ways to more quickly lose the trust of customers than to suffer a major data breach of sensitive user information.

The Benefits of Customer Trust

According to a Wunderman study, 79% of consumers state that brands must demonstrate their understanding and care for them as a customer before they consider purchasing a product or service. However, customer trust plays a major role in not only securing the first purchase from a consumer, but also in encouraging long-term loyalty to a business. From the first interaction and hopefully through the process of many purchases, a customer must trust in a company and the products they offer before they invest their time and finances. Strong, trust-focused design can make a difference in both the long- and short-term success of customer-business relationships.

The Road to Better User Experiences

Better design, stronger digital platforms and greater customer insights all lead to improvements in audience trust. Learn about the strategies that use these elements to create a better customer experience and greater levels of consumer trust.

Read “Four Strategies to Transform Your Customer Experience”   Matthew Draper 2017-12-11T22:18:53Z
Categories: CMS, ECM
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